WILDsound Performer Mena Massoud gets lead role in Aladdin live action film (as Aladdin)

WILDsound Writing and Film Festival Review

Congrats to WILDsound Performer Mena Massoud for grabbing the lead role in the live action film of ALADDIN. The film also stars Will Smith as the Genie.

Mena performed in various scripts for the festival, including the lead role in WEECHO.

Watch the screenplay reading here: 

WEECHO – 1st scene script winning reading
Written by Kevin Gebhard
Rye, New York

CLICK HERE and read the entire winning screenplay

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Marta Legrady
WEECHO – Mena Massoud
CROTTY – Dan Goldberg
LYNCH – Rob Stone
WOMAN – Natalie Gallard
COP – Jimmy Makris

SYNOPSIS:

Photographer Weecho Marti’s shots of a fiery crash reveal a conspiracy murder he is haunted to avenge for the beautiful victim. In his quest to track down the murderous antagonist, he crosses paths with a spymaster who becomes his mentor. Together they navigate an espionage and smuggling labyrinth to bring Weecho face to face with…

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TV REVIEW: TWIN PEAKS – SEASON 3 – EPISODE 10

twin peaksTitled: Part 10: Laura is the One

Director: David Lynch
Writer: Mark Frost

A lot of missing pieces are finally starting to come together on this week’s installment of Twin Peaks. Even though we have a lot more information to work with now, more questions have been raised than those that have been answered. Richard Horne, a certified bad dude who’s somehow involved with Chad and Red in moving drugs across the Canadian border, has now been established as the grandson of Benjamin and Sylvia Horne. After murdering Miriam, and arranging for Chad to intercept the letter she wrote to Sheriff Truman which detailed all of his crimes, Richard violently robs his grandmother and states his intention to flee the country.

Richard bears a striking resemblance to the only member of the Horne family who is currently missing from the series: Audrey. If Richard is Audrey’s son, that begs the question: where is Audrey, and how did her son end up being such an asshole? The last time we saw Audrey was at the end of the previous season, when she was in a coma and was visited by Doppelganger Cooper. Technically, that could mean Bob (through the medium of Doppel Coop) is Richard’s father. Before this episode premiered, some people theorized that Audrey was actually the eccentric billionaire funding the box in New York that leads to the Black Lodge. The reveal that Richard is the grandson of Benjamin makes this slightly less likely in my book, but when it comes to David Lynch, all bets are off until we see something concrete.

Arguably, the best moment of the episode is shirtless Cooper at his doctor’s appointment. Anyone who doubted that Kyle MacLaughlan is still hot after two decades has been thoroughly proven wrong. Cooper also makes a good impression on Janey-E with those pythons he calls arms, and she seduces him in a simultaneously awkward and amazing sex scene. Despite his revitalized love life, Cooper has yet another problem heading his way. Duncan, who we know is working for Bad Coop in Vegas, is orchestrating a conspiracy to convince the casino-owning Mitchum Brothers that Dougie personally sabotaged their plan for insurance fraud.

Meanwhile, Jerry Horne is still high out of his mind in the woods. Is he on a spirit quest to find the entrance to the White Lodge? Or did he just make the rookie mistake of eating too many edibles? Speaking of the White Lodge, Bobby and Truman were noticeably absent from this week’s episode. We do get a moment with Hawk as he speaks on the phone to the Log Lady, who presents a cryptic message, including the episode’s tagline, “Laura is the one.” This premonition, paired with Gordon’s sudden vision of Laura, seems like it’s foreshadowing the return of Laura Palmer.

The construct of time is something that Lynch likes to play with in his work. Even with the established flashbacks that show nuclear testing in the 1940s, I’m not sure that we’re always seeing events in chronological order in this season. The question is presented to us on multiple occasions throughout the series: is it future, or is it past? One thing I’d like to point out is tonight’s performance at the Roadhouse was by Rebekah Del Rio, who previously fulfilled a similar role in Lynch’s masterpiece, Mulholland Drive. In that film, Del Rio’s performance of Llorando, a Spanish version of Roy Orbinson’s Crying, is the dividing point between the fantasy and reality of the film.

Is the Roadhouse a parallel for Club Silencio? It’s absolutely no coincidence that Del Rio is performing in a black and white zigzag dress against a red curtain background, evoking imagery of the Black Lodge itself. Is this episode going to be the line between the illusion and reality of Twin Peaks? We won’t know until next week.

******

“Mary Cox is an entertainment writer from the United States. Her hobbies include making good beer and bad decisions, watching drag queens fight on the internet, and overanalyzing everything. Mary one day hopes to be the person shouting “World Star” in the back of a Waffle House brawl video. She is currently tolerating life in Toronto. You can follow her on Twitter at @M_K_Cox”

Film Review: CHASING CORAL (USA 2017) ***

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival: http://www.wildsound.ca

CHASING CORAL.jpgCoral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. A team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world.

Director: Jeff Orlowski
Writers: Davis Coombe, Vickie Curtis
Stars: Andrew Ackerman, Pim Bongaerts, Neal Cantin
Review by Gilbert Seah

 
Opening Friday July 14th on Netflix and in a few few cinemas (if one can be found in your city), is a Netflix original documentary, and one that is worthwhile to take a look at, in terms of education and importance of the consequences of global warming.

Those familiar with filmmaker Jeff Orlowski will remember his Emmy Award winning documentary CHASING ICE that demonstrated the disappearance of ice on the planet’s surface over time due to climate global warming. This new documentary CHASING CORAL traces the death of corals around the world, again due to global warming. The film is timely arriving at the same time as Al Gore’s sequel to AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH and when President Donald Trump opted out of the G20 climate accord.

CHASING CORAL is both a horror story and a feel good film. Director Orlowski who co-wrote the film follows the standard format for this kind of documentary. The problem is stated, and emphasized throughout the film, then shows the facts on film with the hard and tireless work put in by those involved. He then shows where the problem is headed and what one can do about it. Experts are interviewed to underline the key points in the film.

CHASING CORAL also turns out to be entertaining through the many stunning photographed shots of corals with fish and other creatures that survive on it. Though the complicated cameras are shown, most of the technical details are just lightly touched. All the audience is told is that it is a very tedious and difficult process with turns out very frustrating for the time involved.

Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. A team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world.

The film takes the audiences to various coral reefs around the world. Photographs are shown of dying reefs, bleached white from as far as Thailand, the Florida Keys in the U.S. and the Philippines. The most famous reef of all, The Great Barrier Ref on the east coast of Australia is where the film spends most of the time on. The most horrific fact revealed is that 29% of the corals in the northern part has died in the one year of 2016. The world has also lost 50 % of all the coral life in the past 30 years. A presentation of the fact is shown with spectators wiping tears from their eyes. It is a devastating fact. The reefs feed the ocean life and with that gone, the forests and eventually man will perish through the destruction of the Eco-system.

It i weird that despite all the warnings Orlowski has sounded during his film, he ends it on a positive note saying the emission of carbon fuels are already cut down and that many cities around the world are already doing their part. The U.S. is not on the list of countries doing their part.

Trailer: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v= b6fHA9R2cKI

Also, Free logline submissions. The Writing Festival network averages over 95,000 unique visitors a day.
Great way to get your story out: http://www.wildsound.ca/logline.html

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival:http://www.wildsound.ca

Watch recent Writing Festival Videos. At least 15 winning videos a month:http://www.wildsoundfestival.com

Film Review: TO THE BONE ( USA 2017)

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival: http://www.wildsound.ca

to the boneA young woman is dealing with anorexia. She meets an unconventional doctor who challenges her to face her condition and embrace life.

Director: Marti Noxon
Writer: Marti Noxon
Stars: Lily Collins, Keanu Reeves, Leslie Bibb

Review by Gilbert Seah
 
The credits both opening and closing proudly announces TO THE BONE a film about anorexia, the eating disorder a Netflix original movie. It has been proclaimed that Netflix gets to make films studios are scared to make. This definitely holds true for this depressing, unglamorous project on a subject suffering from anorexia and shunned by her family. But TO THE BONE is so bad that one wonders if the studios could foresee the fact.

One would expect more from director Noxon and lead star Lili Collins who both suffer from the disorder. But the film glamourizes the illness in the way Collins looks so beautiful in every scene and everything she does appears ok and everyone else especially her stepmother is wrong. But unforgivable is the fact that the film is a really boring exercise from start to end. It does not help with the weird ending in which her real mother, Susan (Lili Taylor) feeds her milk from a baby bottle and a fantasy scene in which Ellen she’s herself nude on the ground, presumably dead.

It is hard to judge Collin’s performance when the film is this awful. Taylor does the best she can and Keanu Reeves has the odd role as Ellen’s charismatic doctor who is supposed to a do wonders with his unconventional methods. “I’m not going to treat you if you do not want to live!” He tells Ellen the first time he interviews her.

The story follows teenager Ellen who has dropped out of college. Her stepmother, Judy who lives with her real dad wants her to be cured from her anorexia. But Judy is shown as a very intolerant and bad mother, always criticizing poor Ellen and downright silly, making silly assumptions that Ellen and her stepsister always laugh about. So, Ellen is convinced to go to this medical facility led by Dr. William Beckam (Reeves). There is nothing in the film that shows him to be revolutionary in his treatment. His insistence of telling Ellen’s inner voice to ‘ f*** soft is laughable if not downright unbelievable. The facility consists of an assortment of skinny patients that are there to make Ellen look good. The subplot of Ellen having a romantic fling with the one boy, Luke (Alex Sharp), who wants to be a singer/dancer leads nowhere.

The film at least looks crisp and clear, especially with the desert landscape at the end, courtesy of cinematographer Richard Wong. Music is decent with an original song near the end.

But the film teaches nothing about anorexia nor does it offer any real insight on the people suffering from it. The least the script could have done is provide some medical information on the subject. The film also inserts unnecessary new age material. Ellen’s mother is a lesbian. In one scene, she praises her own breakdown saying people should have them to learn from them. Susan also puts a Ellen in a tent with no electricity with kerosene lamps for light and a bedpan if one need to go do their stuff. Ellen (or Eli, since she changes her name half way through the film for no proper reason) has not come out of life any smarter and neither has the audience.

Trailer: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=705yRfs6Dbs

Also, Free logline submissions. The Writing Festival network averages over 95,000 unique visitors a day.
Great way to get your story out: http://www.wildsound.ca/logline.html

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival:http://www.wildsound.ca

Watch recent Writing Festival Videos. At least 15 winning videos a month:http://www.wildsoundfestival.com

Film Review: RESTLESS CREATURE: WENDY WHELAN (USA 2017) **

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival: http://www.wildsound.ca

RESTLESS CREATURE WENDY WHELANDocumentary on the great American Ballerina Wendy Whelan.

Directors: Linda Saffire, Adam Schlesinger
Star: Wendy Whelan

Review by Gilbert Seah

The RESTLESS CREATURE of the film title stands for the title of the ballet, ballerina and NYC Ballet Company’s principal dancer, Wendy Whelan is performing or it could stand for her restless character as well, one that would never give up dancing. “If I don’t dance, I’d rather die,” Whelan says at one point during an interview in the film.

The film definitely centres on Whelan and she has a lot to say in it. It is a world of ballet and discipline, dance torture to the body and decadence. Perfectly sculptured bodies everywhere! This is not the world that most people are familiar with. The same saying applies to the film. It is strictly for ballet and dance aficionados. Those not in that world will hardly sympathize with Whelan’s complaints. And she can be quite the cry baby, going on and on about herself.

The film is all about Whelan. The film traces her dancing as a very young girl in her hometown of Louisville, Kentucky, then as a teenager on her own in New York and, finally, as a rising ballerina with the company. At the time of the making of the documentary Whelan is in her 40’s. She is dancing still and competing with dancers half her age. Her body cannot take it. In fact no body can be put to such strenuous exertion. Whelan is finally feeling it and her doctors and therapists are advising her to give her body a rest. But she wants to do this last dance.

Linda Saffire and Adam Schlesinger’s documentary looks good on the surface with candid interviews with Whelan and her contemporaries. But upon closer examination, the film just skims the surface on nits subject. Where are her parents from? Nothing is mentioned of her personal life. Does she ever have a boyfriend or girlfriend for that matter? The directors also make no attempt at trying to have the audience connect with their subject. They lay out Whelan bare, warts and all hoping that that the audience feels for her. Whether they succeed depends on the person concerned, but it does not work for me. I find it hard to feel for a person, talented or gifted though they may be, who is so involved in their own world, also is constantly praising themselves and not considering the rest of the world

Whelan has got all her attention and glory and it is time for her to give the younger dancers a chance at the stage. The film also does not really show her dancing at her prime. The film does contain a few show of her performances like “La Sonnambula” and “Symphony in Three Movements by George Balanchine and The Cage by Jerome Robbins. There should be more of Whelan’s performances that demonstrate how hard ballet is for the body. The climax of the film shows Whelan’s performance of RESTLESS CREATURE.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZOWVFr5yg0
 

Also, Free logline submissions. The Writing Festival network averages over 95,000 unique visitors a day.
Great way to get your story out: http://www.wildsound.ca/logline.html

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival:http://www.wildsound.ca

Watch recent Writing Festival Videos. At least 15 winning videos a month:http://www.wildsoundfestival.com

GAME OF THRONES Season 7 EP1 Review: DRAGONSTONE

dragonstone.jpg Arya makes her way south. Jon organizes the defense of the North. Cersei tries to even the odds. Sam adapts to his new life in Oldtown. Daenerys comes home.

Director: Jeremy Podeswa
Writer: D.B. Weiss

Following a narrow escape from Jaqen H’ghar and the Faceless Men, Arya utilizes the talents she learned from the Many-Faced God to take out the last remaining members of the Frey clan. At Winterfell, Sansa Stark and Jon Snow butt heads over whether the King in the North should rule with a gentle heart, or with a heavy hand. In King’s Landing, Cersei is running out of options, and has to turn to the traitorous Euron Greyjoy for help. Samwell Tarley continues to train to be a Maester in the Citadel to gain information to defeat the White Walkers. Last but definitely not least, Daenerys and her dream team from Westeros are finally back in her ancestral home of Dragonstone.

This episode has set the stage for the beginning of the biggest battle in the history of this series, spanning three major contenders for the Iron Throne. It’s also left us with a lot of unanswered questions. Is the mysterious prisoner at the Citadel none other than Jorah Mormont, Daenery’s long-time admirer whose fate is currently unknown? What treasure does Euron Greyjoy intend to bring to Cersei to prove his loyalty? Will tensions between Sansa and Jon settle into place, or Petyr Baelish’s interferences again be the downfall of the King in the North? Only time will tell who will rule the Seven Kingdoms.

 
dragonstone 1.jpg

******
“Mary Cox is an entertainment writer from the United States. Her hobbies include making good beer and bad decisions, watching drag queens fight on the internet, and overanalyzing everything. Mary one day hopes to be the person shouting “World Star” in the back of a Waffle House brawl video. She is currently tolerating life in Toronto. You can follow her on Twitter at @M_K_Cox”t

Under 5min. Film: I & MYSELF, 5min, Japan, Drama/Fantasy

Played at the Under 5 Minute June 2017 Film Festival

I & MYSELF, 5min, Japan, Drama/Fantasy
Directed by Hisanori TsukudaMizuho came to Tokyo to make her dream reality but things have not been going well for her.

CLICK HERE – and see full info and more pics of the film!

Review by Kierston Drier

This five minute Japanese Fantasy drama is a charming romp through the mind of a woman who is consistently too hard on herself. After a long day of perceived mess ups, she exits the train to find, well- herself. But a confident and charming version of herself who takes her out to sushi.

Her new familiar friend takes her out for a night on the town and along the way, she meets several more accomplished versions of herself- showing her all the possibilities she has.

What makes I AND MYSELF special is that, underneath it’s fantastical surface is a message about self love, and acceptance. The main character’s versatility and performance is nothing short of spectacular- it takes several minutes to realize they are all the same actress.

The film is not only well shot and well composed, but has a touching theme underneath it’s whimsical front. A piece about the potential and possibility in everyone, I AND MYSELF is a touching and heart piece.