July 31, 2016 – Writing Festival Details

WILDsound Festival

This week’s writing festival is genre heavy as we will be performing the winning adventure/sci-fi feature screenplay, plus the horror & fantasy short film winners.

They will be performed by some of the top actors working in Toronto today.

Here are the details of the screenplays and stage play being performed:

# 1 – Feature Screenplay – FOR ALL MANKIND by Matthew O’Connell

Genre: Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi

In this high concept, atomic-era, sci-fi adventure, a brilliant WWII veteran and his determined daughter lead a team of mercenaries across the globe in a race to recover a mysterious, supernatural artifact with the power to permanently alter the future of humanity.

#2 – Short Screenplay – SOMETHING UNDER THE BED by Scott Pittock

Genre: Thriller, Sci-Fi

A scientist may or may not be hiding the key to the future under his bed.

#3 – Short Screenplay – MATCHSTICK by Mike Fardy

Genre: Horror, Thriller

Caitlyn’s therapist convinces her…

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Interview with Festival Director Julio Rodríguez Caloggero (International Film Festival / Short Tapiales)

The International Film Festival / Short Tapiales is a film event of important social and cultural impact nonprofit, organized by JC Films OFCT, held in the village of Tapiales, a town belonging to the party of La Matanza, located in the Buenos Aires province. Tapiales Film / Short is also a competitive contest where the selected short films that later received the prize Aborigine according to the ruling of the honorable members of the jury are projected. The event is held under the premise of extolling the popular, free and outdoors, summoning an amount of 3,000 spectators per issue over three days.

INTGRM:@taficfestival TW:@festtapiales
YTB: www.youtube.com/c/TAFICFestivalInternacionaldeCinedeTapiales

Interview with Festival Director Julio Rodríguez Caloggero

Matthew Toffolo: What is your Film Festival succeeding at doing for filmmakers?

JRC: The Tapiales International Film Festival is one of the most important short-film festivals in Argentina. It is known for having the Plaza de Tapiales among its venues for projecting the competing films. This way, you are able to reach to the common people. It brings filmmakers and their movies closer to a warmer audience, different to the one you may find in other festivals —they are not the kind of audience who has the habit of attending film festivals.

MT: What would you expect to experience if you attend the festival this year (2016)?

JRC: This year, the festival will be having a lot of local production again. We will also maintain our high standards, both for the official competition and the parallel projections. This year’s edition wil introduce the Latin American Competition as well.

MT: What are the qualifications for the selected films?

JRC: There is no restriction to the theme of the films, but the runtime is limited to 20 minutes or less.

MT: Do you think that some films really don’t get a fair shake from film festivals? And if so, why?

JRC: Many horror or fantasy films (in our case, short films), for example, can’t find room outside festivals for those specific genres. We care for stories in a more general sense —from social films to sci-fi.

MT: What motivates you and your team to do this festival?

JRC: It’s a social project where we all contribute to the community with what we know. A film festival is an important thing. It shows our cultural development and makes our town a cinmatographic point of reference.

MT: How has the festival changed since its inception?

JRC: For thirteen years, the festival has been growing, expanding to other places. We’ve participated in itinerant projections, both in Argentina and abroad. More venues were added and the number of films on display has increased. We also established (together with the local government) a cinematographic workshop. Our festival is the main screen for local productions to reach the public.

MT: Where do you see the festival by 2020?

JRC: I believe it will continue with its history with and through its people —neighbours and all those who love films.

MT: What film have you seen the most times in your life?

JRC: Pulp Fiction.

MT: In one sentence, what makes a great film?

JRC: Simplicity and honesty.

MT: How is the film scene in your city?

JRC: We are working hard for it, filming and producing as well. Every year we have new productions that are also being displayed in other festivals.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Fesival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go tohttp://www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Festival Director Carl “CJ” Gilbert, Jr. (Ocktober Film Festival)

The Ocktober Film Festival (OFF) is a New York film festival that serves as a platform for artist to express themselves through film and new media. We are heavily involved with the independent filmmaking community and therefore, this festival has become a trusted resource for emerging and established filmmakers. OFF 2015 showcased some of the best visionaries in music and film. This year, we will be expanding our efforts to include more distribution opportunities for all of our selected films.

Interview with Festival Director Carl “CJ” Gilbert, Jr

 Matthew Toffolo: What is your Film Festival succeeding at doing for filmmakers?

CG: Our Film Festival is succeeding at empowering filmmakers through education and active participation. The Ocktober Film Festival was created to provide a platform for filmmakers to express themselves through film and new media.

MT: What would you expect to experience if you attend the festival this year (2016)?

CG: If you attend the Ocktober Film Festival this year, you can expect to see quality films and educational workshops which are being taught by some of the industries leading professionals.

MT: What are the qualifications for the selected films?

CG: At the Ocktober Film Festival we believe in quality work and understand the struggles of filmmakers and for this reason we have NO minimum qualifications for submission.

MT: Do you think that some films really don’t get a fair shake from film festivals? And if so, why?

CG: I do believe that great films do not always get the credit they deserve while in the film festival circuit. The film festival circuit has long been plagued with unfair practices such as favoritism. This was the main reason Emelyn Stuart created the Ocktober Film Festival, to provide a fair marketplace where quality work is recognized, not friendships!

MT: What motivates you and your team to do this festival?

CG: We are all motivated by the opportunities that we have provide to filmmakers each year to better themselves and take their craft to the next level.

MT: How has the festival changed since its inception?

CG: Since it’s inception in 2013, the Ocktober Film Festival has grown to become one of NYC’s leading film festivals. We have added in a Young Adult Category and College Level category as well as introducing an Actors contest which helps to provide a way to involve the actors.

MT: Where do you see the festival by 2020?

CG: By 2020 I envision the film festival having a larger reach and extending our services to not just filmmakers but also to everyone who takes part in a film production. We aim to empower through education and provide quality films and I’m confident that we are on target.

MT: What film have you seen the most times in your life?

CG: THE WIZ!!!!! Greatest show of all time 🙂

MT: In one sentence, what makes a great film?

CG: I believe a great film has several different components, Story Line, editing, acting color correction, sound to name just a few. If any of these are off, it can destroy my experience.

MT: How is the film scene in your city?

CG: NYC is the mecca of film. There are so many filmmakers and actors that I come across who are all trying “make it”. This is a town of wins and losses but the prize goes to those who endure.

ocktober_film_festival.jpg

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Fesival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go tohttp://www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Festival Director Frances Hill (Down Under Berlin Film Festival)

Down Under Berlin was established in 2011 and is a project of the not-for-profit association Down Under Berlin – Australian Film Festival e.V. Since 2011 it has developed into the largest film festival in Europe dedicated to Australian and New Zealand film. As such it provides not only a window to storytelling and cinematography from Down Under but also a platform for filmmakers, who want to present their work to German audiences. The festival showcases a wide range of films including Indigenous cinema, short films, documentaries, experimental and feature films. Down Under Berlin is a member of festiwelt, the Berlin Network of Film Festivals.

http://www.downunderberlin.de

Interview with Festival Director Frances Hill

Matthew Toffolo: What is your Film Festival succeeding at doing for filmmakers?

Frances Hill: Down Under Berlin Film Festival gives Australian and New Zealand filmmakers a new platform for their films in Europe.

MT: What would you expect to experience if you attend the festival this year (2016)?

FH: A range of high quality shorts across all genres, strong independent feature films, entertaining and moving documentaries, and a selection of features from established directors.

MT: What are the qualifications for the selected films?

FH: The films, the directors, or the subject matter must be connected with Australia or New Zealand. We encourage submissions that show off the high standard of filmmaking that can be found Down Under, as well as films that give varied perspectives on these countries and their cultures.

MT: Do you think that some films really don’t get a fair shake from film festivals? And if so, why?

FH: A film festival is always a showcase of many different films, which makes it hard to highlight each and every film that is screened. It’s also a matter of audience and press interest: those films that have bigger names attached to them will be easier to market. But supporting up and coming filmmakers who have produced quality films is just as important, audiences appreciate good films regardless of budget and celebrity.

MT: What motivates you and your team to do this festival?

FH: The Down Under Berlin team is passionate about bringing new and unseen films to Berlin, we want to show our international audience films they cannot see anywhere else. We also see the appreciation from European and German audience members for the cultures of Australia and New Zealand and want to support indigenous filmmaking from Down Under in Europe.

MT: How has the festival changed since its inception?

FH: Our first festival included mostly shorts with a few longer documentary films, which was a result of our reach at the time. We are now part of the Berlin film festival network and are also gaining recognition in Australia and New Zealand for our work. We have increased the number of films and audience members steadily over the years, and are proud to bring great films to Berlin, which otherwise would not be seen in cinemas.

MT: Where do you see the festival by 2020?

FH: We hope to take Down Under Berlin to other cities in Germany, maybe to other countries too. We would like to work more with film schools from Australia and New Zealand whose students are producing amazing films, which we believe should be seen in Europe too.

MT: What film have you seen the most times in your life?

I think The Castle from Australia and Run Lola Run from Germany.

MT: In one sentence, what makes a great film?

A compelling story with captivating visuals.

MT: How is the film scene in your city?

In Berlin the film scene is great, we have studio productions next to independent projects, film school shorts alongside visiting directors from all over the world. Also we have many independent cinemas screening a diverse range of films, including short film nights. Berlin is a fantastic place to make and see films.

down_under_berlin

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Fesival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go tohttp://www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Died Today (July 30th): Claudette Colbert (1903–1996)

claudettecolbertClaudette Colbert (1903–1996)

Born: September 13, 1903 in Saint-Mandé, Val-de-Marne, France
Died: July 30, 1996 (age 92) in Speightstown, Barbados

Married to:
Dr. Joel Pressman (24 December 1935 – 26 February 1968) (his death)
Norman Foster (13 March 1928 – 1935) (divorced)

It Happened One Night
1934
dir. Frank Capra
starring
Clark Gable
Colbert
movie posterTHE SECRET FURY
1950
dir. Mel Ferrer
Starring:
Claudette Colbert
Robert Ryan

 

Died Today (July 30th): Ingmar Bergman (1918–2007)

ingmarbergman.jpg director Ingmar Bergman

Born: July 14, 1918 in Uppsala, Uppsala län, Sweden

Died: July 30, 2007 (age 89) in Fårö, Gotlands län, Sweden

Married to:
Ingrid von Rosen (11 November 1971 – 20 May 1995) (her death) (1 child)
Käbi Laretei (1959 – 1969) (divorced) (1 child)
Gun Grut (1951 – 1959) (divorced) (1 child)
Ellen Bergman (22 July 1945 – 1950) (divorced) (4 children)
Else Fisher (25 March 1943 – 1945) (divorced) (1 child)

SUMMER WITH MONIKASummer with Monika
1953
dir. Bergman
starring
Harriet Andersson
Naemi Briese
Smiles of a summer nightSmiles of a Summer Night
1955
dir. Bergman
Starring
Ulla Jacobsson
Eva Dahlbeck
WILD STRAWBERRIESWild Strawberries
1957
dir. Bergman
Cast: Victor Sjöström
Bibi Andersson
The Seventh SealThe Seventh Seal
1957
dir. Bergman
starring
Max Von Sydow
Gunnar Bjornstand
WINTER LIGHTWinter Light
1962
dir. Bergman
Starring
Max von Sydow
Ingrid Thulin
PERSONAPersona
1966
dir. Bergman
Starring
Bibi Andersson
Liv Ullmann
VARGTIMMENVargtimmen
1968
dir. Ingmar Bergman
Cast
Max von Sydow
Liv Ullman
Fanny and AlexanderFanny and Alexander
1982
dir. Bergman
Cast
Pernilla Allwin
Bertil Guve

Happy Birthday: Peter Bogdanovich

peterbogdanovichPeter Bogdanovich

Born: July 30, 1939 in Kingston, New York, USA

Married to:
Louise Stratten (30 December 1988 – 2001) (divorced)
Polly Platt (June 1962 – 1972) (2 children)

The Last Picture Show
1971
dir. Bogdanovich
Cast
Timothy Bottoms
Jeff Bridges
MOVIEPAPER MOON
1973
dir. Peter Bogdanovich
Starring:
Ryan O’Neal
Tatum O’Neal
THEY ALL LAUGHEDThey All Laughed
1981
dir. Peter Bogdanovich
Cast
Audrey Hepburn
Ben Gazzara
MaskMask
1985
dir. Bogdanovich
starring
Eric Stoltz
Sam Elliot
Noises Off …
1992
dir. Bogdanovich
Starring
Carol Burnett
Michael Caine
THE THING CALLED LOVE MOVIE POSTERThe Thing Called Love
1993
dir. Bogdanovich
Starring
Samantha Mathis
River Phoenix
MOVIE POSTERWHAT’S UP DOC?
1972
dir. Peter Bogdanovich
Stars:
Barbra Streisand
Ryan O’Neal
MOVIE POSTERINFAMOUS
2006
dir. Douglas McGrath
Stars:
Toby Jones
Daniel Craig
MOVIE POSTERHUSTLE
2004
dir. Peter Bogdanovich
Stars:
Tom Sizemore
Dash Mihok
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