February 2019 Film Festival Interviews

Best of the new festival interviews for Feb. 2019. And what they link about FilmFreeway:

Interview with Operations Manager Auregan (Paris Art and Movie Awards PAMA)
https://festivalreviews.org/2019/02/08/interview-with-operations-manager-auregan-paris-art-and-movie-awards-pama/

Amazing : Off to the biggest start we had since the creation of the festival. It’s like people were somehow expecting us to accept entries and… Here we are !

Interview with Festival Director Brent Kado (Chicago Independent Film +TV Festival)
https://festivalreviews.org/2019/02/08/interview-with-festival-director-brent-kado-chicago-independent-film-tv-festival/

Good overall. The main issues with them is, again, this gluttony of festivals and awards “contests” and needing to do better weeding out the scams and misleading events.

Interview with the Festival team of FILMSAAZ
https://festivalreviews.org/2019/02/08/interview-with-the-festival-team-of-filmsaaz/

A great service. Have done wonders for us.

Interview with Festival Director Anastasia Cazabon (GRRL HAUS CINEMA)

https://festivalreviews.org/2019/01/18/interview-with-festival-director-anastasia-cazabon-grrl-haus-cinema/

The FilmFreeway process as been great. It’s a really great platform to view films and super user friendly.

Interview with Festival Director Lynn M. Holley (Fine Arts Film Festival Santa Barbara)

The Fine Arts Film Festival premiered in Santa Barbara, California in 2010; it then occurred as a film festival in Venice, CA in 2015. In 2016 it will explode as an International Fine Arts Film Festival full of shorts plus a few full length features back in fabulous Santa Barbara, California! It will screen at more than one venue, including an outdoor night-time extravaganza. Originally conceived as a festival of films about the fine arts, it now incorporates dance and experimental art forms and approaches.

Interview with Lynn M. Holley:

Matthew Toffolo: What is your Film Festival succeeding at doing for filmmakers?

Lynn M. Holley: Exposure they might not get in major, all-purpose festivals.

MT: What would you expect to experience if you attend the festival this year (2016)?

LMH: Diversity of place, thought and disciplines. We will screen films from around the world.

MT: What are the qualifications for the selected films?

LMH: Made within the last 3 years; related to the visual arts or dance and have some importance to the field.

MT: Do you think that some films really don’t get a fair shake from film festivals? And if so, why?

LMH: All-purpose film festivals often ignore the disciplines in the arts: visual, dance, music, science and technology collaborations, etc..

MT: What motivates you and your team to do this festival?

LMH: The love film and the love of arts.

MT: How has the festival changed since its inception?

LMH: We now take in entries through http://www.Filmfreeway and focus on more genres in the arts.

MT: Where do you see the festival by 2020?

LMH: A larger, more international scene in Santa Barbara CA, which helps promote other film festivals here including the main one SBFF and the Jewish Film Festival.

MT: What film have you seen the most times in your life?

LMH: Caught-In-Paint by Rita Blitt (6 min); and numerous spy films over decades.

MT: In one sentence, what makes a great film?

LMH: There is an importance, a purpose for viewing it that does not require long narratives or dialogue.

MT: How is the film scene in your city?

LMH: Incredible; we are, after all, Santa Barbara, CA, home to Hollywood and the world.

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Lynn M. Holley is an executive consultant to the arts, a resident curator at the new center in Santa Barbara, CA for art, science and technology (SBCAST.org). She was initiated into film as a young film reviewer for a daily newspaper, and then as a journalist and director of galleries and an art center. She is a former journalist, narrative writer and filmmaker for promotions in the arts. She has a B.S. in Communications and an MA in Museum Studies. Ms Holley just returned from giving a presentation to a Global Conference in England on Museums, titled: The Dance of the Muses from Las Vegas to the Louvre.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go towww.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Festival Director Amanda Perry (Cutting Edge Film Festival)

The Cutting Edge Festival is a 501(c)(3) charitable non-profit organization which endeavors to promote the best filmmakers and their films to an ever-growing worldwide audience as a powerful medium that inspires creativity, encourages introspection, and compels the exploration of the senses, and expands the imagination.

The festival uses the monies raised from film submission fees to promote and expand the world of Independent Filmmaking as an ever increasing endeavor.

www.cuttingedgefilmfest.com

Interview with Amanda Perry:

Matthew Toffolo: What is your Film Festival succeeding at doing for filmmakers?

We feel that in the two years since we established our Festival that we have offered hundreds of Filmmakers from around the world a lot of additional exposure for their work to countless lovers of Independent Film the world over. As I’m sure that you know, for an Independent Filmmaker, exposure of their films is everything.

MT: What would you expect to experience if you attend the festival this year (2016)?

First, our festival is produced strictly through a virtual film screening platform, and there really isn’t a physical event to attend. However, what a Filmmaker who is screening at the CEIFF could expect is not only a great deal of exposure for their film, but additionally they should expect the potential for their film to come to the attention of Distributors, and a Filmmaker should most certainly expect that the audiences for their film will be of the warmest kind. What a virtual attendee of our festival should expect should be films of all genres that are among the highest caliber in the world.

MT: What are the qualifications for the selected films?

Like most Festivals in the world, ours makes it’s film selections based on the quality of Directing, cinematography, story line, script plot, writing, acting, production values, and lighting along with many other elements of the film. Most importantly though, we think that a film overall should be entertaining and should capture the viewer’s attention from start to finish.

MT: Do you think that some films really don’t get a fair shake from film festivals? And if so, why?

I think that most Festival, ours included, try their best to offer every Filmmaker who submits their film an equal opportunity to be selected and screened. However, I also think that there are a few Festivals out there that seem to focus more on the big budget films which have celebrities attached to them, and less on the smaller budget films with no celebrity involvement. Though this is not the case with the majority of Festivals, there are a few with this focus, and I feel that it is unfortunate because there are countless films that are produced with little or nearly no budget that would rival those larger budget films.

MT: What motivates you and your team to do this festival?

Very simply, a love of film, a great respect for the Independent Filmmaker, and our passion for the art of Filmmaking.

MT: How has the festival changed since its inception?

The Fest hasn’t really changed, though we have learned quite a bit and have refined many of our systems and processes as to allow for what we feel is a better overall experience for the Filmmaker from the submission process all the way through to the end of the Festival.

MT: Where do you see the festival by 2020?

Hopefully still producing Festivals that are much better, and much more well attended each year.

MT: What film have you seen the most times in your life?

That is really hard to answer because I have seen so very many, both Independent and “Hollywood” films.

MT: In one sentence, what makes a great film?

As I said above, what I think makes a great film is for the film to have the ability to capture the viewer’s attention from start to finish, drawing the viewer into a new reality created by the Filmmaker to the point that the viewer forgets that it’s a movie.

MT: How is the film scene in your city?

As with many cities around this Country, I think the the demand for Independent Film has grown, and will continue to do so over the coming years.

cuttingedge.jpg

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go towww.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Festival Director Sean Gabriel (Shortfest International)

Shortfest International is aimed to promote as much as possible the productions created by our submitters. All foreign films must have English subtitles. Genres including: Sci Fi, Animated, horror, experimental, drama, comedy, thriller, action, documentary. Live screening will be held during the festival on 3 nights where elite personalities from the local scene will be attending this event. There will be a winner for each category. All those who will make it to the end and are nominated for the final award ‘The Best Overall Film’  will have the opportunity to attend or virtually attend to the final night as All films and any other kind of production which are submitted to this festival will be aired on an IPTV channel and it will be promoted on our websites and Facebook pages. This could be a one time opportunity!! Our aim is to turn this event in an annual event where here filmmakers will be able to meet and share their thoughts and ideas, hopefully from all around the globe.

Interview with Festival Director Sean Gabriel:

Matthew Toffolo: What is your Film Festival ​succeeding at doing for filmmakers?

Sean Gabriel: This is our first edition of The Shortfest International Festival and we are hoping that we can be a good helping hand to those producers who dedicate their time and money in creating short movies. Being ourselves a production house and having produced a couple of short films ourselves, we know the dedication and sometimes even financial sacrifices these producers do to get their film casted and produced. When the production is ready and presented to different festivals around the world, some succeed and others not, and are then put on a disk and archived to be forgotten and never given the opportunity to have the chance to screen them and get promoted properly. So we hope that through our initiative, where we created an IP TV channel dedicated solely for short movies incorporating both short film festivals and also content submission for free, we will be able to give the well deserved attention to all these productions having their films screened on an international platform.

Matthew: What would you expect to experience if you attend the festival this year (2016)?

Sean: It will be a wonderful experience for everyone present at the festival. Being our first edition we are very limited financially but we are still giving it our best both in setup and organisation. Several distinct local producers and filmmakers will be present to this festival, some of which will be giving their contribution as part of the judging panel. This will be a good opportunity for those attending to meet up with some of the best local producers and filmmakers having the opportunity to meet in person and maybe share some ideas for future projects they might collaborate in.

Matthew: What are the qualifications for the selected films?

Sean: There are no specific qualifications for the selected films. All short films are welcome as we believe that every film has its story, then it is up to our judges to determine whether a film should be qualified to the next level or not.

Matthew: Do you think that some films really don’t get a fair shake from film festivals? And if so, why?

Sean: I don’t think that there are any specific reasons the way a film is judged and not given a fair shake but then again that is just my opinion. When we participated with our productions we always had what we thought was fair for us, always depending on which festival we were participating in.

Matthew: What motivates you and your team to do this festival?

Sean: The need for more exposure and promotion for such small productions drove us to come up with the idea of this festival boosting it with the idea of having all movies promoted on our channel to which we asked the permission to have their films aired as part as the festival procedure. Some had other commitments and withdrew their submissions and others greeted this idea with enthusiasm to the extent to give us consent to air their production anytime we want during the year.

Matthew: How has the festival changed since its inception?

Sean: This is the first year of our festival therefore there has not been much time for changes even though i have to admit that from the the day we started this festival project to present day we have changed, added and improved alot the festival in terms of promotion and presentation….. and it keeps getting better.

Matthew: Where do you see the festival by 2020?

Sean: Our aim is to make this festival an annual event. In 5 years time we hope that we manage to make it a calendar event in the media industry in Malta, something that filmmakers, producers etc will be looking forward to. Hopefully with some help we could be getting some international professional people in the field to attend our Festival which will definitely make it an important event for the short film enthusiasts.

Matthew: What film have you seen the most times in your life?

Sean: One of the films i love and am never fed up of watching is Gladiator – watched it last week again in fact ….. probably it was the 300th time i watched it lol!!

Matthew: In one sentence, what makes a great film?

Sean: A great film is made when it has an artistic core and every aspect of filmmaking is well prepared and executed.

Matthew: How is the film scene in your city?

Sean: Malta has d same equivalent value in terms of the city you are referring to. With its 440,000 inhabitants the film industry is still very strong. We had some of the best blockbusters here in Malta, to mention a few Gladiator, Troy, Munich, Assassin’s Creed and recently 13 hrs. The people involved in the film industry are very competent and recently a new fresh overhaul in the Film Commission has given the desired results attracting more and more film producers and directors who chose Malta as part of the filming location for their film. As for the local scene unfortunately things are somehow different with alot of emerging filmmakers not having enough opportunity to express their creativity and passion for this industry. This happens just because in the technical dept of filmmaking locally we ar not given much opportunity as most of the films bring their technical crew with them which makes it even harder to get involved.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go tohttp://www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with J. Michael Seyfert (Cine Pobre)

Cine Pobre is a self-funded filmmaking genre without a set of stylistic criteria nor format boundaries, involving many geographically separated creators with at least two things in common: a strong desire to tell our story and to do so with our own resources.

You can also find more info at
www.facebook.com/cinepobre/

I recently sat down with J. Michael Seyfert to talk more about the festival:

Matthew Toffolo: What is your festival succeeding at doing for filmmakers? 

JMS: So far Cine Pobre has co-produced 8 films, and we provide post production talent and technical skills through camera stabilization workshops, and help with branding and niche market exposure. Cine Pobre Film Festival is like filmmaking itself, a collaborative and not a competitive concept.

Matthew: What would you expect to experience if you attend the festival? 

JMS: Personally , unless you’re talking about Orson Welles or Werner Herzog for example I am not keen on listening to a lot of self-congratulating trivia and gossip staged by most film festivals who appear more like cocktail parties. I appreciate excellent programming that has attitude and teeth, to be intriguing,  that’s what Cine Pobre delivers: New Eyes.

Matthew: What are the qualifications for the selected films? 

JMS: Anything goes, but must be self-funded and under $25,000 usd crowd-funding is also accepted, but productions financed by grants and film fund supported budgets are not accepted.

Matthew: Do you think that some films really don’t get a fair shake from film festivals? And if so, why? 

JMS: The business model of conventional festivals, of which there are literally thousands, is strictly a numbers game no matter how idealistic they may cloak themselves. As soon as an event gains some prestige it becomes elitist and exclusionary, rich in overhead and filmmaker exploitative.

Matthew: What motivates you and your team to do this festival? 

JMS: Curating the best self funded films to the widest audience is gratifying, as only the works of story tellers unbeholden to sponsors are censorship-free.

Matthew: How has the festival changed since its inception? 

JMS: Started with small screenings in rural areas to become the largest resource of self-funded film with over 10,000 shorts, features, documentaries, animation, experimental and music videos.

Matthew: Where do you see the festival by 2020?

JMS: We receive entries from about 100 countries and would love to curate films from all 190 states and territories on the planet.

Matthew: What film have you seen the most times in your life?

JMS: Bye Bye Havana

Matthew: In one sentence, what makes a great film? 

JMS: A story so well told that it holds the attention of a 7 year old.

Matthew: How is the film scene in your city? 

JMS: Still emerging from provincialism…. However Cine Pobre is neither stagnant nor static. Over the past 13 years we have taken our screenings to rural areas in Mexico and different countries in Latin America. We hope to also develop events in Africa where many exciting self-funded filmmakers are emerging.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go to http://www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Kristine Renee Farley (MayDay Film Festival)

The MayDay Film Festival originated in May 2009 at the University of Southern Indiana. It was created by a group of student filmmakers.. Year one was about showing off student films at their event to the student body. Since then, it has evolved into a full fledged festival showcasing films from all over the world.

Website: www.maydayfilmfestival.com

Twitter @MayDayFilmFest

I recently sat down with the Festival Director of the Festival:

Matthew Toffolo: What is the MayDay Film Festival succeeding at doing for filmmakers?

Kristine Renee Farley: I consider MayDay Film Festival’s biggest achievement our audience members. Last year we had 500 people in attendance across our 2-day event. Sometimes it can be difficult for independent film to find an audience, but we don’t have that problem at MayDay. We’re also currently in negotiations with international distribution companies. We want to partner with one to get MayDay Film Festival official selections in front of their eyes, and hopefully the rest of the world.

Matthew: What would you expect to experience if you attend the festival this year (2016)?

Kristine: MayDay is alway a fun experience for attendees. We pride ourselves on not being a pretentious film festival. We have vendor booths similar to what you see at conventions. This gives filmmakers a chance to sell their movies as well as other merchandise like tshirts. But we also invite local businesses and artists to rent booth space as well. We want to be interactive with the whole community, and invite anyone who thinks indie film fans would like to buy their product a chance to get it out there. All the info to get a booth is on our website. We also always have a guest artist or two to do a Q&A panel. We’ve had cosplayer Collin Royster, Emmy-award winning writer of Friday the 13th Victor Miller, Jake Lloyd of Star Wars & Jingle all the Way, and the Star Wars 501st Legion in past years.

Matthew: What are the qualifications for the selected films?

Kristine: Our submission guidelines are pretty loose. We like to have a wide variety of films screen at MayDay. During the selection process, we try to keep a good balance of looking at the quality of everything from camera work, image, audio, acting, and story. A filmmaker may not have had the best camera when they made their film, but if the story is amazing, we’ll still take it. Likewise, if a film looks too beautiful to pass up, we sure won’t.

Matthew: Do you think that some films really don’t get a fair shake from film festivals? And if so, why?

Kristine: I agree to a certain extent, yes. I think the bigger film festivals only take “independent” films that are only so just because a studio wasn’t involved. Yes, TECHNICALLY they’re “independent,” but they have huge stars and the best equipment. It makes sense for a festival to accept such movies because it will help their festival be more successful, so I can’t really discredit them for that at all. But I do believe that a lot of really amazing films that didn’t have the budget and didn’t have the stars do get ignored sometimes. Just because they don’t have that selling power. Which kind of leads into your next question…

Matthew: What motivates you and your team to do this festival?

Kristine: We want to give people a chance to get their films seen. That’s the whole point of making a movie! For people to see it! In addition to our fantastic & growing attendance numbers, filmmakers have the opportunity to secure booth space to sell their DVDs to the right audience – people interested in watching indie film.

For me personally, I’m also an actress working in TV & indie film. It’s a wonderful opportunity to see who’s making amazing films & to check out other actors & actresses who are getting work. We have films that come to us from all over the country & the world. It’s a wonderful networking opportunity for anyone in the indie film scene.

Matthew: How has the festival changed since its inception?

Kristine: This festival has changed SO much! It first started as a few students at the University of Southern Indiana showing off short films that they had made that school year. Then the Filmmakers’ Club was created to give students a more organized foundation to create their films since the school doesn’t have a film program. Each year it’s gotten bigger & bigger, incorporating local filmmakers and businesses. Now we’re in an actual movie theatre (Shout out to Showplace Cinemas in Evansville, IN! They’re the best!), showing films on 3 screens, and have international selections each year. I started helping with the fest in year 3. We had 38 submissions total. This year we had 40 our first day. We’re up to 470 currently, and we don’t close submissions until May 1st! We’ve had to bring on more people to get through the first round of watching films.

Matthew: Where do you see the festival by 2020?

Kristine: I certainly hope we continue to grow as much as we have already. At this time, we’re a not for profit event in the sense that we make absolutely no profit, haha. All fees & admissions go straight back into the festival costs. A lot of the time myself and the other coordinators will spend money out of pocket to make sure everything goes off without a hitch. I’d certainly like to see it begin to turn a profit because we have some amazing ideas to expand the MayDay brand into other film related events. If I had my way, we’d have a different themed event each month!

Matthew: What film have you seen the most times in your life?

Kristine: The absolute most times is probably Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. I may have been a teenager when it came out, but I geeked hard core over it. My sister and I were probably watching it 3 times a day that summer we were off from school. I started developing a bit of a British accent. It was pretty crazy, haha. As an adult, it’s probably either Kill Bill or Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. Those films just never get old for me. I notice something new each time I watch them. If you’re talking indie film, you should totally check out Bounty Killer. God, I love that movie.

Matthew: In one sentence, what makes a great film?

Kristine: Oy. ONE sentence? And “great” is so subjective… I’d have to say, “A great film understands it’s audience.” Understanding your audience and how your film is perceived really helps tell a great story. That sentence also allows for films that may not be technically sound, but are still entertaining. &#X1f60a AND it transcends genres. Someone who loves horror may not like romantic comedy, but that doesn’t mean either genre isn’t great.

Matthew: How is the film scene in your city?

Kristine: Well, I’m living in New York City now, so pretty awesome, haha. Back in Evansville, things are pretty hopping, too. The work I got there and the experience I gained have been invaluable to me in pursuing my career. Last year at MayDay Film Fest in particular, the quality of local films skyrocketed. Evansville, IN is definitely holding their own against some of the best films from around the country. Some even won awards against them too! I continue to be impressed year after year at how much my friends & associates in indie film have grown.
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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go to http://www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Festival Director Dave Merson Hess (Rush Process Festival of Handcrafted Animation)

Rush Process celebrates handcrafted animation. The festival’s first edition – set for August 27-28, 2016 in Houston, Texas – will combine curated and competition screenings with filmmaker Q&As and a DIY animation jam. RP aims to screen visually and emotionally stunning, non-digital animation.

I recently sat down with Festival Director Dave Merson Hess to talk more about the festival:

What is Rush Process succeeding at doing for animated filmmakers? 

On the screening side, we’re bringing handcrafted animated films to an enthusiastic audience that appreciates the gesture of choosing to work with tangible, analog materials. And with our workshops, we’re encouraging absolutely everyone to embrace low-budget, DIY animation as both a rich area for visual exploration and an accessible entry point into personal filmmaking.

What would you expect to experience if you attend the festival?

Eye-opening screenings of handcrafted animated shorts from around the world, workshops offering the opportunity to collaborate with complete strangers who share a passion for time-based collage and scribbling, and snacks. We’ll definitely have snacks.

What are the qualifications for the selected films? 

I’m not involved with judging, but I can tell you that we only screen handcrafted animation. These are painstakingly produced films made by hand, with real ink and paint, and often by lone practicioners. To quote our site, handcrafted is “a materials-focused practice at the intersection of DIY, auteur-driven cinema and analog animation art.”

What makes a great independent film? 

A great independent film: 1) chooses the discomfort of honesty and doubt over audience-pandering via formula and cliche, 2) embraces the limitations of the particular context of its own making, and 3) demonstrates a passionate dedication to a unique and highly developed personal or collective vision.

What motivates you and your team to do this festival?

The opportunity to become DIY animation enablers for as large an audience as possible, and the genuine feeling that we’re filling a niche programming void.

>Where do you see the festival by 2020?

I see the workshop element expanding dramatically. Imagine a DIY animation-focused Hack Week, with independent animators, artists and film lovers of all ages meeting and collaborating on free-form, time-bound production challenges.

How has the festival changed since its inception?

Well, 2016 will be our first edition but I’ve been working on Rush Process for a year and a half. It began as an idea for a monthly screening series, then after some reshuffling and delays it morphed into a full-fledged animation festival. On the workshop side, we were inspired by Tom 7’s Crap Art Manifesto, and our friends at Beta Theater’s Make-A-Movie Night, which was this rad monthly happy hour event where filmmakers got together in teams and each made a short start-to-finish in about three hours.

What film have you personally seen the most in your life?

As a teen: Elvira: Mistress of the Dark, Wayne’s World, and Jan Svankmajer’s “Alice”.

While in film school: “Rehearsals for Extinct Anatomies”, by The Brothers Quay.

As an adult: I’m not really someone who re-watches films much anymore. Despite this tendency, the films I’ve spent the most time with in the last five years have been: Penny Lane’s “The Voyagers”, Terence Nance’s feature, “An Oversimplification of Her Beauty”, Karolina Glusiec’s “Velocity”, and my friend Dax Norman’s whole body of work.

How is the film scene in your city?

On the production side, it’s relatively small and a bit fractured, with grant-funded video artists at one end of the spectrum, indie genre filmmakers at the other, documentarians somewhere in the middle, and the vast majority of local film professionals focused on industrials and commercial work.

In terms of curating and screenings, Houston’s film scene is downright incredible. We’ve got Mary Magsamen at Aurora Picture Show bringing the likes of Jodie Mack and Roger Beebe, Houston Cinema Arts Fest, annual festivals hosted by the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, even more screenings at the CAMH, video art/installations/transmedia madness at Civic TV Collective, Peter Lucas’s “Jazz On Film”, the Menil projecting work in a museum context (William Kentridge, anyone?), plus Mystical Crystal Revelations Movie Club showing rad cult flicks, and newer nomadic programmers like Suplex starting to screen stuff around town.

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Bio:
Dave Merson Hess is an animator, media arts educator and film curator based in Houston, Texas.
Twitter: @lofiaction

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go to http://www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.