Inside The Chaos: When to Walk Away from a job.

When to Walk Away from a job.jpgby Kierston Drier

An adage in my family has long since been, “Some of the best jobs are the ones you don’t take.”

I can’t believe I am writing this, but for this first time since entering the world of film and television, I turned down work.

Not just turned it down, but walked away from a job that was handed to me. Walked out in the interview. And I firmly believe it was the right thing to do. I gathered enough information during the interview to understand that the show I was being offered a job in would be far more difficult than the reciprocation they were offering. I’m going to share with you some of the warning signs for what to look for and how to tell when it might be better to let a job pass you by.

KNOW HOW YOU GOT THE CALL

It’s important to start at the beginning here. There is a difference between getting an interview for a mass applied for job posting online, a call from a head hunter, and a personalized referral from a colleague or known source. Mass applied for jobs are likely to have a large pool of applicants, and head hunters can usually guarantee a certain amount of quality in their offers . Referrals are common and trusted in the film and television industry, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t consider the person who referred you, what your professional relationship with them is, and who they chose to send your information to.

KNOW THE COMPANY

Research the production company, the show, and, if possible, the team you’re with. Some shows are secretive and keep their information quiet, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t research the production company or tap your industry resources for reviews and references on working with the company or similar team. Listen to multiple viewpoints, and listen to everyone’s opinion. Don’t make an opinion on your own immediately, but listen to and tuck away what you hear from others and what you glean from your own personal research.

KNOW YOUR JOB

Know what job you’re going in for. Know it inside and out. Know what it takes to do your job correctly and what things you need the job to be able to provide you in order for you to perform your responsibilities. Need access to reliable transportation? Need to be promised a certain type of equipment? A specifically allocated budget? Know what you’d like to have, know what you need to have, and know what the happy medium would be between the two so that you can negotiate comfortably.

KNOW YOUR RATE

This is so so important. Know your rate! Know your personal rate, know the professional rate for that job in general, know what your worth is based on your experience and your craftsmanship. Make sure the people hiring you know what that rate is. Go in with knowing what you’d LIKE to make, what you SHOULD make and what rate is TOO LOW.

There is a strategy to working below rate and working for free. Sometimes it is done for experience, for a special credit, or for a passion project or for a friend. But remember when going in for a JOB, what is your relationship to the employer? If the job is one you have done before, and one you have experience in, then there is little reason you should accept any lower than the standard professional rate. Unless you are doing a favour for a friend or close contact, you should not be willing to negotiate that rate any lower than industry standard.

KNOW WHEN TO WALK

Walk away when:

-The company refuses to answer all your professional questions with clear, informative answers.

-The company or production makes unrealistic promises that they do not put in writing.

-The company  or production uses non-committal language while discussing details that are absolutely necessary for your job to be completed. (Ex. ” We’re pretty sure we’ll have enough money for that [insert absolutely necessary item].”)

-The production or company refuses to pay your kit fee, or supplement you for your own materials without prior discussed and written consent.

-The information you are basing your job around keeps changing.  (Ex. A craft person who constantly gets a different head count number than predicted; a location manager whose location requirements keep changing.)

-The job is physically more hours, labour or requirements than is legal.

Remember,  some jobs aren’t worth the headache!

When to Walk Away from a job2

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Movie Review: ONLY YESTERDAY (Japan 1991) ***1/2

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival: http://www.wildsound.ca

only_yesterdayONLY YESTERDAY (Japan 1991) ***1/2
Directed by Isao Takahata

Starring: Miki Imai, Toshirô Yanagiba, Youko Honna

Review by Gilbert Seah

ONLY YESTERDAY is a 1991 Studio Ghibli film which was generally produced by Master Hayao Miyazaki. Takahata also directed the well-known and loved THE TALE OF PRINCESS KAGUYA and GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES. Studio Ghibli is known to be in financial trouble, so any reworking of the studio’s animated features is a huge welcome.

Though one wonders of the reason ONLY YESTERDAY is the film chosen for the reworking. It is immediately noticeable that the film is so unlike the favourites of Ghibli Studios the most notable being Miyazaki’s HOWL’S MOVING CASTLE, PONYO, MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO and SPIRITED AWAY. There is an absence of Japanese folklore and mythical creatures. Magic, is present though in a different form. In ONLY YESTERDAY, the magic is in the imagination of the heroine and what life has to offer.

The premise is a simple one. 27-year old Taeko (Daisy Ridley) is unmarried. She loves the countryside. She visits her relatives there and a flood of memories brings her back to the days of first romance, puberty (done with much humour and taste) and the frustration of math (division of fractions, of all things) and boys. Takeo meets a young farmer, Toshio (Dev Patel). The two connect with feelings. Taeko is taken aback and feels uncomfortable when she is pressured by Toshio’s parents into marriage with their son.

The 1991 Japanese version is available in laserdisc format but the film has been redone in an English version, with the voices of the now famous Daisy Ridely, who had the lead as Rey in STAR WARS; THE FORCE AWAKENS and SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE’s Dev Patel.

I do not favour any dubbed version of a film, and the pleasure of ONLY YESTERDAY comes especially when the soundtrack with songs in Japanese comes on. But there are lots of American influences in the film, such as baseball and the Beatles, though they also form part of the culture that Taeko grew up with.

The best parts of the film are the simple ones – like the family sitting by the dinner table slicing a pineapple for the first time, or Takeo literally taking flight in an imaginary sequence.
But the film is not without certain flaws. For one, both Ridley and Patel could do British or American accents as Ridley is British and Patel could be coached to do American. But the strong American accent of Ridley’s character and British accent of Patel clash in the film. If one wants to argue that people from the countryside speak with a British accent to differentiate, why then only the Patel character an not the others from the countryside? The film’s imaginary happy ending also leaves the audience a bit bewildered.

But it is the animation of the Ghibli Studios, care of Takahata and his team of artists that triumphs. From the detailed shadows of the characters to the landscape of the countryside and the glorious colour and glow of the insects and background, ONLY YESTERDAY astounds and is the best of what animated films can offer. This alone is worth the visit to this breathtaking work of animated art.

ONLY YESTERDAY celebrates Studio Ghibli’s 25th anniversary (and 30 years in its founding). The studio is sadly in hiatus with no new productions after disappointing box-office receipts of their recent efforts.

Also, Free logline submissions. The Writing Festival network averages over 95,000 unique visitors a day.
Great way to get your story out: http://www.wildsound.ca/logline.html

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival:http://www.wildsound.ca

Watch recent Writing Festival Videos. At least 15 winning videos a month:http://www.wildsoundfestival.com

Today’s INSTAGRAM Photos: Drive-In Movie Theatre Intermission, Stage Play Festival Deadline, Stage Play Festival Deadline

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Watch the October 2015 #Winning #Screenplay Readings (so far) It’s the first week of #October and #WILDsound has already performed and posted 11 screenplay winners this month, including 3 feature screenplay winning readings. Submit your screenplay to the festival today: http://www.wildsound.ca Click and Watch each winning video, plus learn more about the writers and cast: STAGE PLAY – Scary Scary Night October 2015 Reading Written by E. Michael Lunsford http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/scary_scary_night.html FEATURE SCRIPT – Pontiff No Return October 2015 Reading Written by Eric Boyd http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/pontiff_no_return.html FEATURE SCRIPT – 66 West October 2015 Reading Written by Christopher Willis http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/feature_66_west.html FEATURE SCRIPT – Death Don’t Us Part October 2015 Reading Written by Olaf Baumann http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/death_dont_us_part.html BEST SCENE – Unlikely Angels October 2015 Reading Written by Anne Nemes http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/best_scene_unlikely_angels.html #TV #PILOT – Westbound October 2015 Reading Written by Jeff Alulis http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/westbound.html #SHORT SCRIPT – Symposium October 2015 Reading Written by Tom Grady http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/symposium.html 1st. SCENE SCRIPT – Mercy October 2015 Reading Written by George Lewis http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/mercy.html 1st. SCENE SCRIPT – The Arv October 2015 Reading Written by Joshua Collins http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/the_arv.html Best Scene #SCRIPT – Symposium #October #2015 #Reading Written by Peter Harmon and Larry Postel http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/best_scene_comic_cons.html #wildsoundfestivalreview #tableread #writingfestival

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Also, Free logline submissions. The Writing Festival network averages over 95,000 unique visitors a day.
Great way to get your story out: http://www.wildsound.ca/logline.html

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival: http://www.wildsound.ca

Watch recent Writing Festival Videos. At least 15 winning videos a month: http://www.wildsoundfestival.com

Today’s Instagram Photos: The Truth is I Feel You, Game Called Because of Rain, Gun all tied up

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Watch the October 2015 #Winning #Screenplay Readings (so far) It’s the first week of #October and #WILDsound has already performed and posted 11 screenplay winners this month, including 3 feature screenplay winning readings. Submit your screenplay to the festival today: http://www.wildsound.ca Click and Watch each winning video, plus learn more about the writers and cast: STAGE PLAY – Scary Scary Night October 2015 Reading Written by E. Michael Lunsford http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/scary_scary_night.html FEATURE SCRIPT – Pontiff No Return October 2015 Reading Written by Eric Boyd http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/pontiff_no_return.html FEATURE SCRIPT – 66 West October 2015 Reading Written by Christopher Willis http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/feature_66_west.html FEATURE SCRIPT – Death Don’t Us Part October 2015 Reading Written by Olaf Baumann http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/death_dont_us_part.html BEST SCENE – Unlikely Angels October 2015 Reading Written by Anne Nemes http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/best_scene_unlikely_angels.html #TV #PILOT – Westbound October 2015 Reading Written by Jeff Alulis http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/westbound.html #SHORT SCRIPT – Symposium October 2015 Reading Written by Tom Grady http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/symposium.html 1st. SCENE SCRIPT – Mercy October 2015 Reading Written by George Lewis http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/mercy.html 1st. SCENE SCRIPT – The Arv October 2015 Reading Written by Joshua Collins http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/the_arv.html Best Scene #SCRIPT – Symposium #October #2015 #Reading Written by Peter Harmon and Larry Postel http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/best_scene_comic_cons.html #wildsoundfestivalreview #tableread #writingfestival

A post shared by Writing/Film Fest WILDsound (@wildsoundfestival) on

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Also, Free logline submissions. The Writing Festival network averages over 95,000 unique visitors a day.
Great way to get your story out: http://www.wildsound.ca/logline.html

Deadlines to Submit your Screenplay, Novel, Story, or Poem to the festival: http://www.wildsound.ca

Watch recent Writing Festival Videos. At least 15 winning videos a month: http://www.wildsoundfestival.com